Healthcare Update Satellite — 05-14-2015

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Morally corrupt and illegal at any other hospital, but the VA system will sweep it under the rug and absolutely nothing will happen about it. Patient in car just a few feet outside the emergency department calls emergency department for help getting out of car so that he could come in for treatment of his broken foot. Seattle VA Hospital tells him ”No, we’re not going to come get you. You’re going to have to call 911 and you’ll have to pay for that.” A fire captain and three firefighters end up coming to help him out of his care and wheel him into the emergency department.
Meanwhile, the VA changed its story about the incident several times. The best quote was the VA didn’t consider the vet’s condition an “emergency.” Because you can really differentiate emergency from non-emergency over the telephone. Idiots.
Don’t worry, though. The patient has government insurance!

Uninsured rate has decreased under Obamacare, but for some strange reason, the number of emergency department visits keeps rising. Wasn’t this expansive new legislation supposed to stop the problem of emergency department overuse?

The Unaffordable Care Act strikes again. I’ve been harping on the difference between healthcare “insurance” and healthcare “access” for years. Now people are finally starting to understand … when they have insurance and can’t afford care because of insurance copayments. In the past 5 years, copays have increased from 20 to 43%. Copays associated with Obamacare cost even more. The effect is reportedly that more people than ever are delaying treatment for serious medical conditions due to the high costs of care.
Just because you have insurance doesn’t mean that doctors are going to accept it as payment.

Unfortunately, it will probably take a patient death or a huge security breach before this problem is rectified. Patient medication infusion pumps are “the least secure IP enabled device” that one security expert has ever worked with. It is relatively easy to both control the pump and to use the pump to gain access to other devices on the network.

This is a larger problem than people realize. Five year old goes Tasmanian devil mode at school, knocking over bookcases and desks, biting, screaming, and flailing his arms. Teachers call police. Police handcuff child and put him in leg shackles, then take him to the emergency department for evaluation. Wonder what the discharge diagnosis was …
Now child’s mother is “appalled” and “sickened” by the events and she wants everyone involved in the event “investigated.”
The problem with incidents like this is that parents who have a need to blame someone often turn events like this into a no-win situation. If the kid hurts someone when he’s acting out, then the teachers are at fault for not acting quickly enough. If the teachers try to restrain the kid, then they get in trouble for corporal punishment. If the teachers call the cops when he acts out, then they are at fault for overreacting. And if some other kid acts out against little Taz, then the teachers are at fault for that, too.

Probably wouldn’t have mattered in his accident, but still kind of ironic … Georgia politician who campaigned against motorcycle helmets dies in motorcycle accident after he crashes into a car that pulled out in front of him.

Canadian patient left in waiting room of doctor’s office for 90 minutes while staff was at lunch. Gets upset and bills the hospital $112.50 for her time. One of the last lines in her letter was most relevant. How is it that we pay $300 a year or more for our “free” healthcare and yet we are billed for an OHIP covered service?
Remember the Engineer’s Triangle. Fast care, free care, quality care: Pick any two.

Ebola-infected doctor flown to Emory University for treatment and declared cured. Develops burning sensation in his eye and the color of his eye turned from blue to green. Culture of fluid within the eye tests positive for Ebola virus. Article also notes sexual transmission of Ebola six months after patient cured from active disease. Now what?

NY Times article discusses how medical bills are often filled with jargon and indecipherable numerical codes. Up to 90% of hospital bills contain errors and “there is no general law that says bills must be clear and there are no rules about which can be reported to credit agencies.” There *needs* to be a general law saying that bills must be clear. Suing for consumer fraud (which allows plaintiffs to recover attorneys’ fees) is a good way to stop this scam.

Good Morning America article also gives some information on decoding the hidden charges on hospital bills.

2 Comments

  1. The VA…Ugh. What can be said about that mess?
    Now, Ebola…my old Army boss and I talk about this all the time…I use the ProMED site to try and keep up…the virus just keeps mutating and you cannot pinpoint the changes until they happen, it seems. I operate under the premise than absolutely nothing can be taken for granted, when it comes to diseases and viruses.

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