Ken Milne v. Greg Henry at ACEP 2012 [VIDEO]

3 Comments

altKen Milne, MD sits down with Oh Henry author Greg Henry to discuss knowledge translation, information posted online, hesitation in knowledge translation, podcasts and knowledge translation using social media. 

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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51562005" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51562005"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 1 – Knowledge Translation[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]

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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51562006" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51562006"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 2 – Information Posted Online[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51562831" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51562831"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 3 – Hesitation in Knowledge Translation[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51562832" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51562832"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 4 – Podcasts[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51563773" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51563773"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 5 – CME Programs[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/51563772" width="500" height="275" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen]][[/iframe]] [[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/51563772"]]ACEP 2012: Ken Milne Part 6 – Knowledge Translation Using Social Media[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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3 Comments

  1. Long Time E.D. Doc on

    Greg Henry makes an excellent point about being skeptical of social media to impart facts and science related to medicine. Every big name corporation has a social medial team designed to disseminate information through the Facebook/Twitter/Linked-In/Instagram/

  2. Interesting interview! Also, logical perspectives from “Long Time ED Doc” Every consumer (patient and provider) needs to have healthy skepticism (see http://www.epmonthly.com/archives/features/secrets-to-healthy-skepticism/) about all forms of media from Twitter to the traditional journals.

    In my admittedly biased opinion, the difference between most informational (CME) products and the SGEM is the foundation upon which it is built. Specifically, the Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine platform is the only secondary peer-reviewed resource that uses a transparent and explicit selection process to find the evidence and then validates the “practice-changing” potential of the evidence with you — the end users with a scientifically tested metric (see http://www.epmonthly.com/columns/in-my-opinion/information-overload/). This is a different product than any other that EPM readers have seen before.

    Nonetheless, healthy skepticism is a good trait for physician-scientists. Just recognize that BEEM turns the research introspectoscope upon itself to assess the value of the material using scientific methods, whereas other sources use opinion and anecdote without any systematic quality assessment.

  3. Thx Long Time ED Doc. It is not just social medial we should be skeptical of as physicians. Social media is just another tool for knowledge translation/dissemination. Like most tools they can be used for positive things or not-so-positive activities.
    Having a healthy skeptical attitude is an approach to life/medicine. This skepticism applies even to TheSGEM.
    As Dr. Carpenter points out the information being delivered through TheSGEM project has been filtered via the Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine group from McMaster. Their methods, non-association with any form of sponsorship and EBM skills provides a very high quality CME product.
    Please listen to the podcasts. You will find that the final statement is always to [i][b]”be skeptical of anything you are taught/learn, even if you learned it on TheSGEM”.[/b][/i] I don’t think big corporations make statements at the end of their content warning the audience to think critically about the message.
    Thanks again for the constructive feedback,
    Ken Milne

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